Anhui

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Anhui is a province in the People's Republic of China. Located in eastern China across the basins of the Yangtze River and the Huai River, it borders Jiangsu to the east, Zhejiang to the southeast, Jiangxi to the south, Hubei to the southwest, Henan to the northwest, and Shandong for a tiny section in the north. The capital of the province is Hefei.

The name "Anhui" derives from the names of two cities in south Anhui, Anqing and Huizhou (now Huangshan City). The abbreviation for Anhui is "皖" (Wǎn), because there were historically a State of Wan, a Mount Wan, and a Wan river in the province.

Anhui Activities

Chao Lake: Old name for Jiaohu Lake, the Chao Lake gained its present name for the shape like a bird's nest. It is a national scenic spot listed as on of the most famous freshwater lakes in China with rivers, lakes, hot springs and mountains as its greatest sceneries. It is always the first choice for visitors to the city.

Cao Cao’s Underground Military Tunnel is in the old city zone. It was built by the General Cao Cao during the Three Kingdoms Period (220-280), reputed as the underground Great Wall, the brick, clay and wood tunnels stretch around the Dayushou. 

Located in the eastern suburb of Bengbu, Longzi Lake Scenic Area is composed of Longzi Lake, Xuehua Mountain, Caoshan Mountain, Xilu Mountain and Zhuizi Mountain. Covering an area of eleven square miles, with over one third of it being the water area, Longzi Lake Scenic Area is famous for breathtaking natural scenery as well as rich historical relics.

Yingjiang Temple is a well-known temple located on the banks of the Yangtze River. Built in the Song Dynasty (960-1279), it was first called Wanfo Temple. During the Qing Dynasty (1644-1911) the name was changed to Yingjiang Temple. The Zhenfeng Pagoda is located in the temple. Standing 73 meters (240 feet) high with seven tiers, it offers visitors a superb view of the city. 

Huangshan mountain range in southern Anhui province in eastern China. The range composed of material that was uplifted from an ancient sea during the Mesozoic era, 100 million years ago. The mountains themselves were carved by glaciers during the Quaternary. Vegetation on the range is thickest below 1,100 meters (3,600 ft), with trees growing up to the treeline at 1,800 meters (5,900 ft).